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Tourism Industry

By Bernard

This is the Report Paper from NCdt Nicholas A. Zavergiu about the Tourism Industry.  Here are his original front page and table of contents.

Travel and Tourism Industry

Economics Report 7

November 30th, 2008

Presented To: Mr. B. Gangé

Nicholas A. Zavergiu

Table of Contents
Introduction
Non-Economic Problems
9/11
Global Pollution
Family Values
Economic Problems
Gas Prices
  Elasticity
  Canada’s Travel Allure
  Gas Prices of Yesterday
  Gas Consumption Data
Economic Recession
  Canadian National Accommodation Averages
Hotel Growth Supply in Canada
  Possible Solution
Conclusion
Mediagraphy

Introduction

My economic interest lies in world travel and the aspects of tourism. The world we know today has become increasingly smaller over the years thanks to high technology updates, faster means of transportation and media that has interests all over the planet.  World travel is an interest of mine in part because I would one day like to do as much of it as possible and also because billions of dollars are spent each year on travelling to exterior countries.

The uses of travel are two-fold; pleasure and business. Every day people use world travel as a means of seeing the world and visiting family and friends. This generally is a very hefty expense the average person could only afford once a year. Vacationing calls for many expenses: mode of travel, accommodations, food, entertainment, and sight-seeing. As a basic rule, when one travels for pleasure it costs more than a business travel. Business travel usually calls for accommodation and mode of travel only, as we are not usually being entertained or enjoying the sights during our business trips.

Taxis make a great portion of there pay driving to and from hotels because those who travel usually do not have cars to go from their hotels to the airport or vice-versa. In a city like New York or Paris, taxi drivers have to wait only a couple minutes before someone calls for their service. On the island of Montreal, there is a basic fair of $35.00 to go from the airport to downtown. An analysis of the prices is a great way to estimate what the general profit is for a taxi driver benefitting from tourists.

Nowadays cities are competing against one another to attract as many people as possible. The city of Montreal, for example, fights to keep the Jazz festival, Canadian Grand-Prix and summer rock fests available every summer to contribute to the city’s Gross Domestic Product. Toronto has its film festival and Calgary has the Stampede. Travel is a good way to make cities interesting and the best cities are usually those that have the best attractions.

Hotels are a very important factor for world travel. They compete against one another to deliver the best service at the best price in order to attract more customers and generate more revenue. Hotels are rated on a star basis and those with good ratings usually try to use their rating to their advantage. Three or four star hotels will try to go for service at a good price while the higher-end hotels raise their prices and try to deliver top-quality service.  These hotels do this to try to focus on a specific customer to serve and attract.

Tourism Industry:

  1. Tourism after 911<
  2. Tourism and Global Pollution<
  3. Tourism and Family Values<
  4. Tourism and Gas Prices<
  5. Tourism and Economic Recession<
  6. Possible Solution for Tourism<
  7. Mediagraphy on the Tourism Industry<
  8. Conclusion on the Tourism Industry<

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